Naperville Astronomical Association
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NAA Calendar of Events

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

November 27

28

29

30

December 1

2
Members Only Night at AEC @ 7:00pm

3
Public Night at our Astronomy Education Center @ 7:00pm- 10:00pm
volunteers needed

4

5

6
NAA Regular Meeting @ 7:30pm

7

8

9

10

11

12

13
NAA Board Meeting

14

15

16

17

18

19

20
Astronomy Fundamentals Program @ 7:30pm

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30
Members Only Night at AEC @ 7:00pm

31

January 1

2

3
NAA Regular Meeting @ 7:30pm

4

5

6

7
Public Night at our Astronomy Education Center @ 7:00pm- 10:00pm
volunteers needed

8

9

10
NAA Board Meeting

11

12

13

14

15

16

17
Astronomy Fundamentals Program @ 7:30pm

18

19

20

21
Public Night at our Astronomy Education Center @ 7:00pm- 10:00pm
volunteers needed

      Green entries indicate events which are open to the public (come join us!)
      Purple entries are events being run by other organizations; we provide an outside link for more information, if one is available.
      Black entries are events for club members only. Click here to find out how to join the club.
      volunteers needed indicates an event which member volunteers will be staffing; NAA members are encouraged to respond to announcements asking for volunteers.


Real-Time Posting of Weather Cancellations for Observing Events

Check our Home Page for Go/Cancel notices posted several hours before scheduled starting times
or subscribe to the @naperastro Twitter feed for mobile alerts.


   

The Presentation for our December 2016 monthly meeting


The Evolution of Binary Stars


Presenter: Dr. Arend J. Poelarends, Wheaton College
Date: Tuesday, December 6th, 2016
Location: Naperville Municipal Center, downstairs meeting room B (see map for directions)
Time: 7:30 pm.

More than half of the stars we see in our galaxy are members of multiple star systems, held in orbits with their companions by gravity, rather than being "off on their own" like our Sun.
Dr. Poelarends will explain how current theories of star formation and evolution illustrate how belonging to a multiple star system affects the natures of these stars.

The public is welcome to attend, free of charge.




 

Next NAA Board Meeting:

The next meeting of the NAA Executive Board will be December 13th at the Culver's Restaurant, Naperville (Rt. 59 & 75th St.) Starting time 7:30 pm, all N.A.A. members are welcome to attend.



 

Our December Astronomy Fundamentals Program


Introduction to Astrophotography


Presenter: Eric Claeys, NAA
Date: Tuesday, December 20th, 2016
Location: Naperville Municipal Center, downstairs meeting room B (see map for directions)
Time: 7:30 pm.

Taking photographs of the heavens can be an enjoyable part of amateur astronomy. It can also be anything from a simple practice using common camera equipment to a complex undertaking using specialized gear. Eric will give us an overview of how to plan, take, and process astro photographs. This talk will help the beginner figure out where they should jump in, what equipment is required, and what results they might expect.

The public is welcome to attend, free of charge.



 

The Presentation for our January 2017 monthly meeting


Chasing shadows - Why observe occultations?


Presenter: Robert Dunford, NAA, Argonne National Laboratory
Date: Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017
Location: Naperville Municipal Center, downstairs meeting room B (see map for directions)

Time: 7:30 pm.

Most asteroids are too small and too far away to be accurately imaged by even the largest telescopes on Earth, so it is difficult to determine their size. One solution is to observe asteroid occultations. In an occultation, an asteroid passes between the earth and a star causing the star to be briefly eclipsed. By accurately timing the duration of the occultation, one makes a measurement of the length of a chord across the asteroid. With several observers strategically placed relative to the "shadow" path, both the size and shape of the asteroid can be determined. Small portable telescopes such as those used by amateur astronomers are ideal instruments for observing occultations, since they can be easily transported to the predicted path. Occultations of stars by the moon are also of interest as they can be used to discover close companions of stars and, if a star just grazes the edge of the moon from the observer's position, occultation data can be used to measure the heights and depths of lunar features. This presentation will explain how an amateur with quite modest equipment can participate in the observation of lunar and asteroid occultations. The resources provided by the International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA) will also be discussed. IOTA provides extensive information on their web sites, including how-to manuals, equipment recommendations, and reports of recent measurements. Free software is also available for predicting occultations, organizing teams for specific events, and for analyzing data obtained from observations. This is a great time to get involved in observing occultations because path predictions will soon be much improved, using data obtained from the ESA's Gaia spacecraft

The public is welcome to attend, free of charge.



 

Our January Astronomy Fundamentals Program


Getting it into view: Practical methods for aiming telescopes at things you can't see with the naked eye.


Presenter: Drew Carhart, NAA
Date: Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
Location: Naperville Municipal Center, downstairs meeting room B (see map for directions)
Time: 7:30 pm.

The clear nighttime sky is filled with objects which you can see with your telescope, but can't detect with your unaided eye. How do you get your telescope's tiny field of view centered on these objects? Drew will draw upon his decades of telescope use to describe and pass along practical pointers on a number of methods which can be used, primarily focusing on telescopes and binoculars mounted on non-GoTo mountings.

The public is welcome to attend, free of charge.





 
 

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